World Alzheimer’s Day

21st September 2020, worldwide.

What is dementia?

The word ‘dementia’ describes a set of symptoms that may include memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving or language. These changes are often small to start with, but for someone with dementia they have become severe enough to affect daily life. A person with dementia may also experience changes in their mood or behaviour.

Dementia is caused when the brain is damaged by diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease or a series of strokes. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, but not the only one. The specific symptoms that someone with dementia experiences will depend on the parts of the brain that are damaged and the disease that is causing the dementia.

What is World Alzheimer’s Day?

World Alzheimer’s Day takes place every year on 21 September. It is the focus of World Alzheimer’s Month during the month of September. This year’s focus is stigma, and we need your help to break the stereotypes and myths that surround a dementia diagnosis. 

World Alzheimer’s Day is an international campaign to raise awareness and highlight issues faced by people affected by dementia. It’s an opportunity for people and organisations to demonstrate how we can overcome these issues and help people live well with dementia.

Globally, dementia is one of the biggest challenges we face, with nearly 50 million people living with dementia worldwide. To tackle this global dementia challenge we need to work together, and to collaborate and share best practice with one another.

This is why we have committed to work with partners on global research and campaigning, as well as sharing our learning, best practice and experience with one another.

Breaking the stigma

Families affected by dementia are facing an illness that’s often frightening and debilitating. They shouldn’t also have to deal with ignorance, thoughtlessness and cruelty from the people around them.

We often hear from carers who’ve had to deal with rude comments or stares while out in public with their loved one. We’ve heard from people with dementia who’ve had to listen to unpleasant jokes or thoughtless comments from people who just don’t understand the realities of their condition. 

Dementia isn’t a joke – and people affected by it deserve to be treated with understanding and respect. 

General Information
Date: 21st September 2020

Location: worldwide

For more information and detailed program visit the website.


Published in GI-Mail 09/2020 (English edition).

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