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U.S. foreign policy to restrict abortion funding results in more abortions

Stanford Medicine

A U.S. foreign policy opposing abortion has resulted in less funding for family planning and birth control, leading to more unwanted pregnancies, a Stanford study found.

A U.S. foreign policy that cuts money to nongovernmental organizations performing or promoting abortions abroad has actually led to an increase in abortions, according to Stanford researchers who have conducted the most comprehensive academic study of the policy’s impact.

Eran Bendavid, MD, and Grant Miller, PhD — both associate professors of medicine at the School of Medicine — and graduate student Nina Brooks found that abortions increased among women in African countries where NGOs, such as the International Planned Parenthood Federation, were particularly vulnerable to the policy’s requirements.

The policy, widely known as the Mexico City Policy, explicitly prohibits U.S. foreign aid from flowing to any NGO that does not agree to abide by the policy’s main condition: no performing or discussing abortion as a method of family planning, even if just in the form of education or counseling.

The policy has been a political hot potato since its inception. Enacted under Ronald Reagan in 1984, it’s been enforced by subsequent Republican administrations, whereas Democrats in the White House have revoked the policy within days of taking office.

Read the whole article on the Stanford Medicine Homepage.

Autor: Krysten Crawford   Quelle: Stanford Medicine, 10th July 2019
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